The misadventures of a first time father

Tag Archives: animation

It’s Schoolhouse Rocky,
that chip off the block
Of your favorite schoolhouse,
Schoolhouse Rock!

School House Rock

Learning comes in all forms. Some people are visual learners. Some auditory. Some need to get their hands in the thick of it to grasp concepts the best. I’m of the belief that regardless of what kind of ways you learn best, we retain the most concepts when we’re having fun with those concepts. Sometimes it’s a project in school that got you jazzed to be taking part in, or a teacher that made you laugh while you learned. The association with your enjoyment brings back and retains the knowledge you gained along with it. 

And I think that’s why Schoolhouse Rock! has been a reference point for so many of us from the 1970s, 80s, 90s, and to my surprise, beyond.

In case you weren’t around during any of its original run or its encore, the Emmy award-winning Schoolhouse Rock was a series of short animation segments that aired in between various Saturday morning cartoons on ABC. With humor and catchy tunes, they taught elements of history, civics, grammar, science, math, and more. Its initial run lasted more than a decade, from 1973 to 1984, and came back with a mix of new and old episodes for a few years in the early 1990s. 

To my generation, they’re classics, but they’re the sort of thing I’ve always felt would end up being just a fond memory of our childhood when we look back on those halcyon days of Saturday morning lineups, a box of cereal, and toy commercials that flood through our nostalgia-soaked minds. So imagine my surprise when I recently walked into the living room to find all our children laughing along with the series, courtesy of Disney+!

Since the series was released on the streaming platform earlier this month, they’ve watched them over and over again, quickly weeding out their favorites, viewing them (and singing along) again and again.

There’s certainly no shortage of great entries in the Schoolhouse Rock series, but in no particular order, I present to you our kids’ top three Schoolhouse Rock installments to both educate and earworm!

 

I’m Just a Bill

The 1976 classic still gets a lot of play in our home, and its influence already has our 7 year old discussing the process of lawmaking in discussions. Spoofed dozens of times over the years, this one stands out as probably the most famous of School House Rock entries, with a walking, talking bill explaining to a small boy why he’s sitting on Capitol Hill, hoping he doesn’t die in committee, and can one day become a law. History rock that makes an impression – for any generation! 

 

Interjection!

Hey! Wow! Yeow! Hooray! They show emotion! They show excitement! Sometimes with an exclamation point or a comma if the feeling isn’t strong. A wonderful 1974 entry in the grammar themed segments, whether it’s a great grade on a report card, a shot in the bum by the doctor, or losing the big game, this drives home with various scenarios how much the words we use can express ourselves when used correctly. 

 

The Tale of Mr. Morton

One of the later entries into the series, this one comes from the early 90s but is no less catchy and fun.In the story of shy Mr Morton, the song teaches the grammar elements of subject and predicate. Our kids quote its small bits of dialogue all the time and I find myself walking around singing part of its chorus “Mr Morton is the subject of the sentence, and what the predicate says, he does.”


What about you? Were you a Schoolhouse Rock fan? Any favorites on your personal playists? Feel free to share them!


russi taylorI think about Russi Taylor a lot.

I know that’s a weird sentence to start a piece with, but it’s true.

It’s said that when she was a little girl, Russi was at Disneyland with her mother and brother when she spotted Walt Disney sitting on a bench in the park at night. They started up a conversation and when Walt asked her what she wanted to do when she grew up, the young Russi replied, “Work for you!” And she did.

In 1986 she beat out 200 others auditioning for the role of the famous female mouse and she has voiced her ever since.

She was no one-trick pony either. Her career included voice-overs for countless other characters across television and film, including Martin Prince on The Simpsons and Huey, Dewey and Louie in the original DuckTales. And those who work with her say she was just as sweet as the Minnie she portrayed.

She passed away in July at the age of 75, but her work…well, like so many others, it’s around me every single day.

Minnie and DaisyWith three kids at home, we watch a lot of Mickey and Minnie Mouse cartoons. From Mickey’s Clubhouse and Minnie’s Bow-tique to Roadster Racers and Mixed Up Adventures, Minnie’s with us every there. And that means that Russi Taylor’s Minnie is a constant presence. Throw in any Minnie Mouse doll, toy car, toy phone or anything else that talks in-character, and well, she’s heard about as much as any family member.

That’s a little strange, right? This person whom I’ve never met in my life but felt sadness for upon hearing of her passing. I didn’t know Russi Taylor. But like so many who experience characters that have become such a part of our lives, you don’t need to know them personally for them to mean something to you. She gave voice and life for more than 30 years to a beloved character that’s been a part of multiple childhoods.

CHIP, DALE, DONALD, MICKEY, PLUTO, MINNIE, JIMINY JOHNSON, DANNI SUE, DAISY, CUCKOO LOCA, GOOFYAnd yet, though she is no longer with us, the Disney Legend continues to live on in every character she brought to life and every childhood she touched and brought joy to. The sound of Minnie Mouse surrounds so many of us every day, and because of that, she has become such a large part of so many childhoods, lives, and lives on in some small way in each person whose face she brought a smile to, even if it was remotely, through the wonder of animation and technology.


Oh My Disney​ has followed up last year’s “Ducktales with Real Ducks” video with a real Chipmunk take on another Disney Afternoon favorite – Chip ‘n Dale Rescue Rangers​.

The Ducktales video was followed by an announcement of a reboot for the show, something I had been pushing for quite some time. Well, not so much a reboot as taking advantage of the audience desire and much of the voice cast still, thankfully with us. Unfortunately, it since has been stated that Disney is not going to be using any of the original Ducktales voice cast, which is quite saddening.

Look, I can understand wanting to give Alan Young, 95 and June Foray, 98 (Scrooge McDuck and Magica DeSpell, respectively) a bit of a rest. And yes, we’ve lost some actors like the great Hamilton Camp (Fenton Crackshell/Gizmoduck) and Hal Smith (Gyro Gearloose and Flintheart Glomgold). But come on, Disney. Terence McGovern, the only voice of Launchpad McQuack, is only 73. Russi Taylor, who voices Huey, Dewey and Louie is only 71. Frank Welker, who voices some of the Beagle Boys is still actively working on Curious George, Scooby Doo and many other television shows at 69.

We’re big Disney Afternoon fans in our house. They made up after-school viewing when Meg and I were growing up and our little guy is just as much a fan, from Rescue Rangers, to Ducktales, to Darkwing Duck (also discussed recently for a possible reboot if the 2017 Ducktales relaunch goes well). There’s just something about those adventures and derring-do that’s still just as captivating today as it was a few decades ago.

I wager this recent video means we’ll be getting news about the previously announced Rescue Rangers CGI/Live Action Feature Film soon.


It’s this kind of ridiculous fun that makes me love old 1950s/1960s comic books (and the current cartoons based upon them):

The video stalls in the first 7 seconds, but bear with it. It’s the only version I could find online.



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